Kim and Sam Review Shades of Earth (Across the Universe Trilogy #3) by Beth Revis

shadesI get REALLY nervous when I start reading the first book in a trilogy.  Not because I think it’ll be bad, but because I’ve had the luck where I get sucked in by the first two books, read the third, and find myself incredibly disappointed.  This happened to me with Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games ( 1, 2, 3), Tessa Dare’s Wanton Dairymaid Trilogy, and Lauren Royal’s Flower Trilogy just to name a few.  Now this isn’t to say that I’ve had bad luck with ALL trilogies, I had just enough of the above experience happen to cause a nervousness when an author announces a trilogy.

When I first heard about the Across the Universe trilogy by Beth Revis I’ll admit I was excited at the prospect of a dystopic sci-fi adventure in space.  When I finished Across the Universe and A Million Suns my nervousness hit an all time high.  A Million Suns had blown book one out of the water for me.  I was so impressed with the new heights that Revis had taken Amy and Elder to, that I knew she had set an unattainable (in my eyes) precedent that book three just would not be able to reach.  Now that I’ve read book three, I’m happy to say that Revis has proven me wrong.  I’ve asked fellow staffer Sam to join me today to discuss Shades of Earth, book three in the Across the Universe trilogy.  I hope you’ll join our discussion below!

From Goodreads:

Amy and Elder have finally left the oppressive walls of the spaceship Godspeed behind. They’re ready to start life afresh–to build a home–on Centauri-Earth, the planet that Amy has traveled 25 trillion miles across the universe to experience.

But this new Earth isn’t the paradise Amy had been hoping for. There are giant pterodactyl-like birds, purple flowers with mind-numbing toxins, and mysterious, unexplained ruins that hold more secrets than their stone walls first let on. The biggest secret of all? Godspeed’s former passengers aren’t alone on this planet. And if they’re going to stay, they’ll have to fight.

Amy and Elder must race to discover who–or what–else is out there if they are to have any hope of saving their struggling colony and building a future together. They will have to look inward to the very core of what makes them human on this, their most harrowing journey yet. Because if the colony collapses? Then everything they have sacrificed–friends, family, life on Earth–will have been for nothing.

Kim: I am so (x 100) impressed with Shades of Earth.  I think it’s the most beautifully written of the three and the most mature.  I don’t say mature as a bad thing (like risqué content), I say mature because we see Amy and Elder in these massively responsible roles, with the weight of a new society on their shoulders.  The people of Godspeed look to them to help transition them from “space folk” to “Earth folk.”  Not only is this massive transition happening, but people are going missing, strange animals are popping up, people are having weird reactions to the natural fauna, etc.  Throughout all of this they must deal with their own personal relationship and how it fits into their new lives.

Sam: My biggest problem with trilogies is that they tend to be a major letdown by the third book. However, like Kim, I was very impressed and satisfied with Shades of Earth. What I really enjoyed about the writing was that Revis stays true to herself as a science fiction writer. She didn’t disappoint with her beautifully crafted alien planet. Every detail that she included was purposeful and painted a clear picture of a world unknown.

Kim: I have to agree with your statement about the alien planet being beautifully crafted.  Revis’ descriptions of the flowers, the mountains, the lake, etc were exquisitely detailed.  The world visually came to life right before my eyes.  I especially liked the first rainstorm and how all the Godspeed folk thought the sky was exploding.  Their responses to things that we as “Earth folk” just “know” was humorous but also eye-opening.  It made me think, gee, if I had never been outside before how would I react to rain, snow, thunder, or lightening?  Not only was the world beautifully crafted, but the characters were too.

Sam: I was the most taken by Elder’s evolution. In this book he becomes a true leader in his own right, the one that all of his people needed and that I as a reader really wanted him to be. In the previous installments we see him training to be a leader, then trying desperately to actually be one without much guidance. When Amy shows up in his life, all of his thinking starts to change. By book 3 we see him taking what he’s learned from his leadership training and fusing it with what he now knows to be true. This book is the first time that we see Elder making his own decisions without someone prompting him. I like that way that his people seem to follow him, not just because he’s the Eldest, but because he has finally earned the title. He can hold his own now and his merit as a leader is clearest when we realize all of the sacrifices he is willing to make for those who love and respect him. I think that’s what I love most about this character.

Kim:  Ditto to everything Sam said about Elder.  I think that I’ve seen him evolve so much in the past two books and Amy so little, that I expected Amy’s transformation to take center stage in Shades of Earth.  Revis does an incredible job of maturing Amy.  Amy has seemed super selfish at times in the past two books (and in the beginning of Shades of Earth).  Here, dealing with all she is forced to, she begins to see things in a new light and begins thinking of how much she’s grown, changed, and learned.  At one point her father (now unfrozen) asks her what she’s learned during her time awake in space.  Her response (below) definitely shows a new, mature Amy.

I learned that life is so, so fragile. I learned that you can know someone for just days and never forget the impression he left on you. I learned that art can be beautiful and sad at the same time. I learned that if someone loves you, he’ll wait for you to love him back. I learned that how much you want something doesn’t determine whether you get it or not, that “no” might not be enough, that life isn’t fair, that my parents can’t save me, that maybe no one can.

I think that Amy’s transformation is due in part to two things. 1. She sees how much Elder has taken responsibility for and tries to emulate him. 2. The way her parents treat her when they wake up definitely impacts her future behavior   Her parents just continue to treat her like a spoiled brat and ignore the changes she knows have personally happened.  When her parents refuse to see the changes she’s made, that’s when I think she realizes that maybe those changes aren’t so visible after all.  Maybe she needs to work on herself just a bit more.

Sam: One theme that really resonated with me was the idea that no one is ever completely trustworthy. No matter how much Amy tries to find someone who she can confide in and really rely on, they always seem to let her down. Even Elder keeps certain truths from her in an effort to protect her. The one character who seemed to be the most likely to betray Amy and Elder, was Orion. Yet, in the end, it was his knowledge and wisdom that helped them discover the truth about Centauri Earth.

Kim: I have to agree here.  It’s the old adage of don’t judge a book by its cover.  Orion is definitely the one in A Million Suns that you just wanted to smack by the end.  The scavenger hunt (while awesome as a plot device) was so frustrating for Amy and Elder.  Orion refuses to cooperate and just help.  I found it interesting that he always made you earn the knowledge he had.  Every time I think about him, I think that he would have made a horrible Eldest.  Had he truly cared about the people on Godspeed he would have shared all the knowledge he had, instead of slinking around everywhere making Elder and Amy search for clues.  And even when they did figure out what the clues meant, he still wouldn’t be upfront. (Can you tell he frustrates me!?!)

Sam: “To be a Jedi is to face the truth, and choose. Give off light or give off darkness. Be a candle, or the night.” I am not going to go so far as to say that Orion is Yoda in this book, however, I think that Elder never would have made the choices he did if Orion had simply told him what was happening below Godspeed. I think that he had to lead Elder on that scavenger hunt, to uncover the truth. As a good leader, Elder had to choose. Be the candle to lead them all to the unknown, or, like so many Eldests before him, be the night that kept them “safe” in the shadows. Perhaps he would have been a horrible Eldest, but I think he was a pretty decent if not slimy mentor.

Kim: Damn. You’re good.

Sam: I was disappointed in the way that Amy’s parents, particularly her father, couldn’t see how much she had grown and changed. He didn’t take the time to see that she was an equal in terms of leadership capabilities. As Kim mentioned before, Amy has matured a lot on this voyage. She has completely transformed into such an intelligent woman. I think her father didn’t know quite how to handle that.

Kim: Yes! Amy’s dad was THE WORST.  When he’s initially unfrozen and finds out that Amy’s been awake for a few months he freaks. Instead of taking a few minutes and letting her catch him up on what’s been going on, he delegates her to a corner to just sit quietly.  He refuses to accept that his daughter and her teenage boyfriend could have any knowledge or authority that could help him.  He was extremely nazi-like to be honest.  I get that he just woke up after being frozen for hundreds of years, but have some faith in your daughter.  His complete dismissal of anything she said from beginning to end of the novel really irked me.  And his attitude toward Elder? COMPLETELY uncalled for.  He deserves everything he got.

Amy’s mom on the other hand seems incredibly naive.  She can’t even fathom that Amy’s father is hiding things from her and the others.  At times she reminded me of a battered woman.  Her husband’s word was law and there was no disputing it.  She focused on her research and Amy, two things that served to be the beginning foundation towards her “new” life.

Sam: I couldn’t agree more. I don’t know what it was about Elder that bothered dad so much, given the company that he was keeping. Also, mom. I think Kim said it all. She was so absorbed in her research that she couldn’t see anything that was going on around her, and there was A LOT to take in. This family just doesn’t really stand a chance for getting back together. They’ve moved so far away from each other even though they had been just inches from one another for hundreds of years.

The elephant in the room is of course, Chris. From the moment he waltzed up behind Amy’s Dad and totally stepped into Elder’s territory, I did not like him. He did NOTHING to try to redeem himself throughout the story, and in the end turned out to be even worse than I wanted to imagine. So what if he has big blue eyes, Amy! This is not the man who helped you survive for three months without any family, or protected you from ridicule, or loved you for you. This is just some guy your father is obsessed with because he’s some kind of super soldier tech guy.

To her credit, Amy does figure this out eventually. But it took far too long if you ask me. I was not a fan of her whole “what if Elder wasn’t the last guy on Earth” routine.

Kim: Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.  I found myself getting so angry with Amy at multiple sections of this book. My biggest yelling out loud moment? The time she leaves Elder’s house and goes for a stroll with Chris and kisses him. WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH YOU, YOU BIG HUSSY? Elder has protected you, saved you, trusted you, shared himself with you, and basically (in essentials) given his life to you. Do you disregard the value of his love so much that you can just turn your back on him and go for midnight strolls with anyone giving you attention!? Jeez.

Sam: Absolutely! The other part, and I still don’t know how I feel about it, is that Elder just lets it go. He spies on them, gives her space, but never once makes her feel bad about blatantly flirting with Chris, sometimes RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM. On the one hand I respect Elder for letting her be her own woman and trusting Amy that much. On the other hand, come on… stand up for yourself, Elder!

Kim: This is just another example of why Elder is the better guy.  He never tries to force Amy to make a decision to be or not to be with him.  I find it interesting that the people of Godspeed had no religious belief.  Interesting, because Elder has a lot of faith that things will be ok and will work themselves out.  He lets Amy have her space and do what she wants with it, knowing that his love is the strongest and will win.

Sam: I wasn’t going to go for the religious belief stuff, but since you mention it 🙂 I really loved that Amy’s faith was so strong in this series. There were so many references to her cross and her faith in something more. I think that it was that faith that helped her stay strong and really gave her something to latch on to. In this series, Revis asks these characters to have a lot of faith in things unseen. Planets and people far away. I think that Amy was better prepared to handle the faith in something unknown because of her religion. As for the people of Godspeed, I found that in the absence of religion they put all of their faith in the “Eldest” system. The Eldest was the one person who was going to make choices and decisions for them all, he was the one they looked to when they weren’t sure of their fate.

Kim: Exactly! The “Eldest” of the time became their deity and the one they looked to for guidance and leadership.  Their faith didn’t have to follow a sight unseen rule as Amy’s did.  I actually think that theirs might have been a more difficult road to follow.  If something happened that wasn’t to their benefit or how they wanted it to be, they could directly go to their “deity” and complain and wish it wasn’t so.  They could tangibly make their “deity” change things for their benefit or their detriment.  If the Eldest didn’t change it for you, the road stopped. No matter how much you “prayed” on it, it wouldn’t change. I believe that this in essence is a more difficult faith to have, because your life (and the control to change it) is completely out of your hands.

Sam: Earlier we talked about Orion’s little scavenger hunt for Elder and Amy. In that he gave them clues to try to find a deeper meaning, to uncover the truth about what was really going on with Godspeed and Centauri Earth. Ever since Revis released the title of this third book, Shades of Earth, I’ve felt a little like Elder. I am a VERY BIG fan of the Beatles so I noticed right away that the lyric wasn’t quite right. It’s meant to be “shades of life.” Why would she just go for it with the Beatles lyric in the first two and then change it up for the last book? Now, maybe there’s nothing to it, but maybe, just maybe it means something.

This whole series really centers around what it means to be alive, really living. Amy can’t really cope with life on Godspeed. To her it is too confining. She can’t run. Can’t feel the real sun on her face or the real rain on her skin. In that way, it is just a shadow of a life. For Elder, he can’t really cope with being the only one his age, groomed for his position as Eldest. His life without a true companion and confidante is a shadow of a life that he desperately wants. So there are the dark shades of their lives.

But, what about the light parts? First, Amy’s bright red hair. A color so vibrant that all at once it makes Elder come to life and he has to know her, to unfreeze her and see such a color for himself up close. Next, the adventure. A shade of life that both terrifies and excites them. Finally, their love for each other. All of these elements combined create the canvas of a life so bright, yet dark that it seems to mirror one of Harley’s haunting yet beautiful paintings. The shades of their life together. The life that they are going to create here on Centauri Earth, which is merely a different shade of the same planet they left behind.

Kim:  Fellow readers, there you have it.  Sam couldn’t have said it any better.  The Across the Universe trilogy is filled with amazing imagery, exquisite characters, thrilling plots, and above all else, depth.  Beth Revis may have written these books with the young adult crowd in mind, but she has written with such vitality that she’s hooked the adult crowd too.  This trilogy defies convention and refuses to be boxed in for a certain genre or age group.  Sam and I both highly recommend it.  There is so much more within these novels than what meets the eye.  Give them a shot and see what you make of them.

Kim’s Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars
Sam’s Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

This is my first completed review for the Color Coded Challenge

Shades of Earth by Beth Revis
Razorbill (2013)
Hardcover: 369 pages
ISBN: 9781595143990

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#58 A Review of A Million Suns (Across the Universe Trilogy #2) by Beth Revis

Todd and Kim here!  Back again to continue our joint reviews of the Across the Universe trilogy! (Book 1 review is here).  Picking up shortly after the end of book 1, Revis takes us back into space aboard the Godspeed.  Unfortunately, the ship, which was once governed by lies, is now fueled by complete chaos.

At the start of A Million Suns, we pick up soon after the death of Eldest and the beginning of Elder’s rule as the leader of the ship.  Phydus use has been discontinued, and Elder and Amy have agreed to keep the population Phydus-free in order to preserve everyone’s sense of individuality and commonality.  You’d think we were at the dawn of a new and happy age for the people of Godspeed.  Unfortunately, however, this cannot be further from the truth.  Once the workers of the Feeder Level realize that they can get away without coming to work, or relying on others to do work for them, discord begins to spread.  Fights break out, and many doubt Elder’s leadership.  Bartie, once Elder’s friend, has now risen to an almost cult-like status, with many viewing him as the face of the revolution that seems to be building momentum.  Adding to this, Elder and Amy discover a series of clues that Orion left behind that lead them to a secret so huge and unthinkable that it will change the face of life of Godspeed forever.  Will Elder be able to keep control of the ship’s population?  Will Amy still want to be with him after he has to make unpopular decisions for the good of the ship?  What is this massive secret that Orion has alluded to?

Kim: I seriously have never been so angry at myself for picking up a trilogy before it’s been completely published.  Revis is a mastermind at making the reader CRAVE more.  There were so many twists and turns in A Million Suns that as Todd was reading the book I’d grab it out of his hands and count the pages until the next “big event” happened so we could discuss!  I was so antsy reading the entire second book!  Following the scavenger hunt all along the entire ship and trying to decipher what all of the clues meant was absolutely riveting.  I haven’t been glued to a book series like this since The Hunger Games!  

Todd:  I definitely agree with Kim!  I cannot wait for the final book in this trilogy to come out.  Revis has written an amazingly good follow-up to Across the Universe.  The character development of Elder and Amy is fantastic, as Elder is thrust into a job that is made for someone with a lot more experience, all genetics aside.  The interplay between his character and Amy is really interesting, as they represent such polar opposites that it’s so cool to see how they interact and bring out different parts of each other.  Adding to this the backdrop of the HUGE secret that comes out towards the end of the novel, and I was flying through the pages trying to finish reading.

Kim: When I was reading the tag line for A Million Suns about how the ship was run on lies and is now fueled by chaos, I couldn’t wait to see what that all meant.  The transformation of the ship’s passengers from one book to the next was really well done.  Imagine finding out that you’ve been drugged and lied to for years…of course you’re going to start rebelling and mistrusting everything that you’re being told.  I found the deeper character conflicts taking centerfold in A Million Suns vs the individual conflicts that occurred in Across the Universe.  We’re treated to the bigger picture this time, and it’s just as hectic and chaotic as the relationship between Elder and Eldest was in Across the Universe.  In Suns we’re offered an opportunity to learn more about the ship, its history, and the other people living/working on board.  By taking this route Revis has made Godspeed its own character – complete with secrets and stories still waiting to be told.

Todd:  I agree completely.  I happen to like this work better than the first based on the inclusion of more “big picture” events.  I don’t want to downplay the importance of the relationships between the characters, or the fact that the first novel had to spend a good amount of time introducing us to this whole world of The Godspeed in the first place, but I kept thinking about what all the lies in the first book were actually covering up.  After I finished it, I was so excited to start this book as it’s really the “meat” of the story.  We find out that lies that seemed big in the first novel are minuscule compared to what Elder and Amy find out about the ship in this novel.  Revis’ writing style is great because she is slowly leading us to the big reveal: her third work.  The scale has increased from book to book, and she’s definitely set us up for an amazing story in Shades of Earth.  I don’t know if I can stand the wait!

Kim: I know I am DYING, waiting for Shades of Earth. Anyone else out there read this series and losing the will to wait longer?!?

So there you have it, both of our takes on Beth Revis’ wonderful second book in the Across the Universe trilogy.  If you haven’t read the first one yet, go get it.  And if you have read Across the Universe, why are you wasting time reading this review?  Get reading!

Kim’s Rating: 6 out of 5 Stars

Todd’s Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

A Million Suns by Beth Revis
Penguin (2012)
Hardcover: 400 pages
ISBN: 9781595143983

#36 A Review of Across the Universe (Across the Universe Trilogy #1) by Beth Revis

So it has been a while since either Todd or I finished a book and then shoved it in the other’s face to read it ASAP.  I recently finished reading Across the Universe by Beth Revis; ran through our apartment and thrust it into Todd’s face. “You MUST read this.  It’s science fiction which you love. It takes place in space – you love that. It’s a dystopian novel.”  That’s all it took for Todd to pick the book up and read it.  Here we are now, a few weeks later, both bursting at the seams to spill our guts about this novel/series.

Revis’ Across the Universe takes place centuries from now, on a ship known as “Godspeed” jettisoned from Earth in the hopes that its inhabitants will be able to land and successfully colonize Centauri-Earth, the closest inhabitable planet to our own.  Now over 250 years after her launch, Godspeed is currently populated by roughly 3,000 inhabitants which are organized by their primary job on the ship.  The ship is mainly comprised of “feeders” whose sole job is to provide for those on the ship, whether it be via food, textiles, or other consumables.  “Shippers” are the next stage, whose responsibility is to keep the ship running and take care of its day-to-day activities.  Finally, there is an Elder and Eldest.  The Eldest is the ruler of the people of the ship, and his Elder is second in command.  Eldest is grooming Elder to become the leader of the new generation of the ship, as he is old and will soon be unfit to rule.  Half of the novel is told through the eyes of Elder, and deals with his mixed feelings of responsibility for those on the ship and hatred towards Eldest, who rules with an iron fist.  The other half is told by Amy, a girl who is one of a hundred people who were cryogenically frozen at the beginning of Godspeed’s journey over 250 years ago.  The plan was to reanimate them once the ship landed, and they were picked for their specific skills that would prove useful on the new planet.  Amy is “nonessential cargo”, as she has no specific useful skill set but is the child of two important parents, and thus allowed to be frozen.  Unfortunately, she is unfrozen by an unknown person over 50 years before the ship is scheduled to land.  What will she think of this new race of humans on the ship?  Will Elder be able to come to grips with his duty?  What will he think of Amy?

Todd:  As Kim alluded to before, I’m a huge sci-fi fan.  Admittedly, I will like most novels in this genre regardless, but this particular one was a personal favorite.  The social commentary was spot on, and the story was engaging and made me want to keep reading.  Elder was an extremely likable character, and I felt as if I would have acted in the exact same way if I were put in his shoes.  His interactions with Amy really change the way in which he acts and views himself as a leader.  As the true face of Eldest comes to light, the entire tone changes.  It was a really interesting turn of events that I didn’t see coming and was super surprising.

Kim: I definitely agree with Todd about the characters.  Amy and Elder are now happily situated among my absolute favorite characters ever.  They’re both so intriguing!  Amy is such a strong female character, definitely one young adults can look up to and admire.  She stands for what she believes in, never backing down for fear of anything.  Elder, on the other hand, is so genuinely good.  His heart is 1,000 times larger than himself and he is constantly standing up for those around him.  Besides the amazing characters in this book is a major mystery that is filled with suspense, murder, and betrayal at every turn.  There were so many twists and turns (all perfectly written) that I found myself unable to put the book down until I finished it.  Revis does an amazing job at unfolding each piece of the puzzle in a perfectly timed and thought out manner.

Todd: Kim has a great point.  One of the best characteristics of Revis’ writing is that it’s like an onion.  She slowly peels back layer by layer, adding more complexities to the original mystery.  By the time I reached the end of the novel, life on Godspeed was completely different than it was in the beginning.  Amy and Elder’s character transformations were intriguing and were a great background to the greater story of the peril that those on Godspeed face.  The completely different world that those on the ship live as opposed to the world that you and I know is a point of contention and friction between Amy and Elder, and it’s a great way to introduce the differences in morals as well between Elder’s and Amy’s generations.  Additionally, there is still plenty of potential left for more action and suspense in the other two novels in the trilogy.  The end of the book left a large cliffhanger that sets up an even bigger problem than the one faced in this novel.

Kim: I was thrilled to know that book two of the trilogy, A Million Suns, was published shortly before I finished Across the Universe.  The plight of The Godspeed, Amy, and Elder totally roped me in and I could not wait to continue.  With the amount of mysteries, lies, and deception that were present in book one I couldn’t even fathom what else could happen in the other two books!  Revis is a skilled writer, one whose career you should follow if you’re not already.

Todd’s Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

Kim’s Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

This is my tenth completed review for the Around The Stack In How Many Ways Challenge

Across the Universe by Beth Revis
Penguin Group (2011)
Paperback: 416 pages
ISBN:  9781595144676

The March Round-Up

Holy crap. Where did March go? March was a JAM packed month of busy-ness for me! I am happy to report though that I had my best reading month ever! 21 books in one month! That’s ALMOST a book a day. Yippee!!  I’m not sure how I had such a hardcore book binge this month because I was stuck doing about 1,000 other things.  The 21 books brings my year-to-date total up to 49 books.  I’m almost half way to my total goal for the year!

Todd and I made more trips to NYC this month. (This is beginning to happen like every other weekend) Anyway, I was fortunate to get to meet up with two of my very good Twitter friends, Christine and Stacey, for the first time and experience Newsies on Broadway with them! I had the absolute time of my life.  The three of us have been conversing of our love for Newsies the movie for months and months and months.  When the news came out that it was hitting Broadway the three of us immediately started making plans.  Turns out Christine was flying to NY in March anyway to meet up with another friend, and decided that a trip to see Newsies was a necessary addition to her agenda!  We had fantastic seats, the play was amazing, and it couldn’t have been a better weekend (celebrating St. Patrick’s Day in NYC is also not too shabby).

Dad, Christine, and Mom

The following weekend we again traveled to NYC, this time for my sister Christine’s thesis defense.  She has worked tirelessly for the past six years and was granted her PhD with distinguished honors.  Needless to say my entire family is extremely proud of her.  She was the first person in my immediate family to graduate from college, get a master’s degree, and we can now add getting a PhD to that list!!  We had a fabulous celebration for her that included beers and karaoke.  (Honestly, is there anything better?)

The day after her defense Todd and I went to go see Spiderman: Turn Off the Lights on Broadway.  We had fantastic seats right in what is called “the landing zone”.  For those unfamiliar with the show, the actors frequently fly off and on to the stage via harnesses on the ceiling to stimulate Spiderman’s “web-action flying”.  It was one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen in my life.  The choreography needed to do the stunts must have taken forever to put together.  It was really impressive.

Besides all of the above I’ve kept busy with our bowling league, Relay for Life meetings, and some follow-up doctor visits for Todd. Thankfully, it seems he’s back to the state he was in prior to his accident. (Read my February Round-Up for more info)

Of everything I’ve read this month, my favorite book was A Million Suns by Beth Revis!  I cannot wait to write my review and share it with you.  A Million Suns is the second book in the Across The Universe Trilogy.  I have 11 months to go before the third and final book in the trilogy is being released.  I am slowly going mad with the wait….

I tried to keep my book selections eclectic as always, but wound up reading a ton of romance novels!  This has to do mainly with my discovery of Tessa Dare and Marie Force.  Both women wrote romance series that had me hooked.  Marie Force wrote the McCarthys of Gansett Island series, which currently has five books in it.  My review of book one, Maid For Love, is here.  Tessa Dare wrote two series that roped me in: The Wanton Dairymaid Trilogy and the Spindle Cove Series.  Coincidentally, Dare just released the second book in the Spindle Cove Series on March 27th. (yes, duh I bought/read it at midnight)  My reviews for all the books in these three series will hopefully be completed by mid April.  I owe y’all so many reviews it’s crazy.

April is lining up to be a pretty exciting month.  Adam’s got a historical fiction review coming, Todd has some more science fiction and fantasy reviews, and Charlie’s working on film reviews of The Hunger Games and John Carter.  I’ve got some exciting books to tell you about this month including The Flower Reader, The Kitchen Daughter, Across the Universe, and A Million Suns!  Author Regina Jeffers will also be guest posting this month in celebration of her new book The Disappearance of Georgiana Darcy, slated for an April 10th release!

Belle!

In closing I’d like to wish my beautiful kitten Belle a happy 5th birthday.  She’s been with me since my senior year in college, and I don’t know what I’d do without her cute face greeting me when I get home everyday!

I think that pretty much sums up March! As always let me know what you’ve been reading and any recommendations you’ve got for me!

Happy Reading =)

My Top Ten – Film Soundtracks by Adam Part I

In lieu of Kim doing a top ten list this month, I asked if I could take a crack at it and do my top ten favorite film soundtracks.  Since I’m the blog’s film reviewer, I thought it would be appropriate to do a film themed top ten!  In a well-done film, the soundtrack is almost as important as the acting or directing.  In scenes where there is no dialogue, the music helps tell the story and convey the emotions that words cannot.  Let me know what you think of my picks and what some of your most memorable soundtracks are.

10.) The Social Network

This score is incredibly powerful for such an amazing film. Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails and Atticus Ross were able to create this soundtrack using many different musical styles and techniques that go against traditional musical scores. There were no big orchestral pieces where you could picture a room of old man playing their instruments for hours.  Instead, it was very technologically based, which worked for the tone and style in which the film was filmed.  Being a film that is so largely about technology, it made sense that it wasn’t violins, harps, flutes, and saxophones playing the highlights of the score.  A personal favorite would be the main theme, “Hand Cover Bruise”, which played in some of the most poignant scenes in the film.

9.) Inception

This list may look like the nominees from last year’s Academy Awards, but that’s only because the scores were so incredible. Hans Zimmer, the composer, was able to translate the feelings of the world that Christopher Nolan had visually created through music.  Zimmer creates these musical pieces that are so dramatic in style yet very traditional with the choice of  instruments. This score literally makes the dream sequences in the film come to life and jump off the screen.

8.) Across the Universe

Across the Universe took a big gamble with its soundtrack.  To take Beatles songs that we all know and love and change them was an incredible risk because they are such well-loved classics.  So many people relate to these songs, and to do these songs an injustice would be considered a crime.  Even so, they took the risk, changed the songs enough to make them true to both the film and their original roots, and fans still loved the music.  The composers used many different styles of music to rework the original compositions, from gospel all the way to a slowed down, acid-tripped feeling melody.  Any Beatles fans be it new or old will be singing these songs days after seeing the film; they’re so original that you can’t help but have them stick with you.

7.) Psycho

Hitchcock was and is the master of suspense films.  All of his films are perfection, from the screenplay to the acting to the twist endings that he was so known for.  Music was a huge reason why his films were so successful.  The man who composed the score for Psycho, Bernard Herman, (he also did Vertigo, North by Northwest, and the Trouble with Harry), was able to encapsulate the fear that comes with watching a film like this.  The way he was able to create the element of suspense without even showing you anything visually was incredible.  The main theme to this film is something that haunts the viewer.  Even if you aren’t looking at the screen, you’re still scared somebody or something might pop out behind you.  The most terrifying part is the screeching (which was actually done with violin strings) when Norman Bates attacked.

6.) West Side Story

West Side Story is my favorite soundtrack for a traditional musical.  The story of the Jets vs. Sharks comes to life with this music, which was composed by the infamous Leonard Bernstein.  This musical has everything: comedic songs, love songs, fighting songs, and death songs.  The songs are each musically different and distinct, which is one of the reasons why they’re so good.  The funny songs are upbeat and played in a fast pace with loud instruments, whereas the love songs are delicate and played with very light instruments like strings and flutes.  West Side Story is a perfect date night film, where you can close your eyes and let the music tell you this sad tale.

 I hope you liked my first five picks for the best film soundtracks! Come back tomorrow and see what my top five picks are.

Until then, happy listening!